James Effiwatt, 64, Brooklyn, New York has been arraigned on an indictment in which he is charged with grand larceny and burglary for allegedly filing a fake deed to transfer ownership of his landlord’s $759,000 rental property to a trust in the defendant’s name.

According to the investigation, on January 15, 2021, Effiwatt allegedly recorded a deed to a three-story house at 36 Hubbard Place, Brooklyn, New York that transferred the title of the property from the owner, Hubbard Estates LLC, to an entity called the “Ayonkladd Trust,” of which the defendant was the trustee. The deed was allegedly signed by Effiwatt as a grantor despite the fact that the defendant is not a member or trustee of Hubbard Estates LLC. The building has an assessed value of $759,000. The property has been owned by the legitimate owner, a 49-year-old woman, since 2015.

The investigation revealed that Effiwatt is a former tenant of 36 Hubbard Place who lived in the third-floor attic apartment for several years beginning in August 2015. Effiwatt allegedly stopped paying rent in the summer of 2017 and was eventually ordered to vacate the property in October 2019 by city housing officials over housing code violations. However, it is alleged that Effiwatt subsequently moved back into the attic apartment where he has remained since. Additionally, beginning in March 2021, Effiwatt allegedly approached several other tenants of the property and demanded they pay him rent. Effiwatt also allegedly approached a real estate broker and discussed selling the property for six or seven hundred thousand dollars.

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez today made the announcement.

District Attorney Gonzalez said, “This defendant allegedly filed a fake deed in an unlawful attempt to take ownership of his landlord’s property. Title theft is a serious crime that deprives hard-working people of the single most important asset any American can hope to own. As real estate values continue to rise dramatically in Brooklyn, I remain committed to protecting homeowners across the borough from fraudsters who would steal their security and investment in the future.”

The defendant was arraigned today before Brooklyn Supreme Court Justice Danny Chun on an indictment in which he is charged with one count of second-degree burglary, one count of second-degree grand larceny and two counts of fourth-degree attempted grand larceny. The defendant was ordered held on bail of $25,000 bond or $10,000 cash and to return to court on February 15, 2022.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant District Attorney Francis Longobardi, Special Counsel to the District Attorney’s Real Estate Frauds Unit, under the supervision of Assistant District Attorney Richard Farrell, Unit Chief, Assistant District Attorney Gregory Pavlides, Chief of the Frauds Bureau, Assistant District Attorney Michel Spanakos, Deputy Chief of the Investigations Division and the overall supervision of Assistant District Attorney Patricia McNeill, Chief of the Investigations Division.

 

Martin D. Eagan, 50, Montville, New Jersey, today admitted his role in a reverse mortgage fraud scheme that exploited several elderly homeowners.

According to documents filed in this case and statements made in court:

Eagan, principal of the Martin D. Eagan Law Firm, was an attorney licensed by the state of New Jersey with a practice in Morristown, New Jersey, that primarily focused on real estate transactions, such as loan originations, reverse mortgages and the refinancing of residential homes.

From 2007 through 2010, Eagan, acting as a settlement agent, was required to comply with instructions established by financial institutions that provided loan funds to borrowers. As part of the lending process, Eagan was required to generate and certify HUD-1 settlement statements that Eagan submitted to lenders. The HUD-1 settlement statement itemized the receipt and disbursement of all funds for each real estate closing. HUD-1 settlement statements were required to be approved by a lender before a settlement agent could disburse funds. The disbursement of funds had to mirror the representations made on the lender-approved HUD-1.

Eagan and his conspirators submitted fraudulent documentation to lenders to persuade lenders to approve and fund reverse mortgages and the refinancing of existing mortgages. Fraudulent documentation submitted included false HUD-1s that concealed from the lenders the fact that disbursements of loan proceeds went to conspirators, or entities the conspirators owned or controlled, and false appraisals that overstated the value of homes.

Eagan, his conspirators, and others controlled the loan application process from the time the homeowners applied for loans to the disbursement of loan funds, and ultimately through the diversion of loan proceeds to conspirators.

Eagan pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Anne E. Thompson to an information charging him with one count of conspiracy to commit bank fraud.

The conspiracy to commit bank fraud carries a maximum potential penalty of 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine. Sentencing is scheduled for April 14, 2022.

U.S. Attorney Philip R. Sellinger made the announcement.

U.S. Attorney Sellinger credited special agents of the FBI, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr. in Newark, and special agents of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Office of Inspector General, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Robert Manchak, with the investigation leading to today’s guilty plea.

The government is represented by Special Assistant U.S. Attorneys Kevin Di Gregory and Charlie L. Divine of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Office of Inspector General.

 

Michael P. Flavin, 38, Quincy, Massachusetts, a real estate broker pleaded guilty today to operating a scheme in which he falsely marketed properties that were not for sale, or had already been sold, and then stole the buyers’ real estate deposits.

Between 2017 and April 2020, Flavin solicited deposits on real estate transactions by marketing numerous real estate properties that were not actually for sale. In each case, Flavin executed purchase and sale agreements and received deposit checks from or on behalf of the potential buyers, even though the actual owners of the properties had not agreed to sell their properties or to sell them to those buyers. Flavin forged the signatures of the sellers on the purported purchase and sale agreements. Over this period of approximately three years, Flavin cashed more than 60 deposit checks totaling approximately $1.8 million.

The charges of wire fraud each provide for a sentence of up to 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000 or twice the gross gain or loss, whichever is greater. The charges of aggravated identity theft each provide for a mandatory sentence of two years in prison to be served consecutive to any other sentence imposed, up to one year of supervised release and a fine of $250,000. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Flavin pleaded guilty to two counts of wire fraud and two counts of aggravated identity theft. U.S. District Court Judge Allison D. Burroughs scheduled sentencing for April 12, 2022.

Acting United States Attorney Nathaniel Mendell and Joseph R. Bonavolonta, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Division made the announcement today. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Victor A. Wild and Sara Miron Bloom of Mendell’s Securities, Financial & Cyber Fraud Unit are prosecuting the case.

 

Franklin A. Olaitan, 48, Beltsville, Maryland, has been charged in a 10-count indictment with carrying out a scheme to steal a residence located in the District of Columbia and then reselling the property to an unsuspecting buyer.

As alleged in the indictment, Olaitan perpetrated a scheme in which he obtained a residential real property located in the 2000 block of First Street NW, District of Columbia by submitting false documents to lenders, a settlement company, and the District of Columbia Recorder of Deeds. It is alleged that Olaitan quickly resold the residential property to an unsuspecting buyer and received the seller’s proceeds from both purported sales of the property.  In the real estate closings, first, a lender paid approximately $420,000 and, second, a purchaser paid about $550,000.

Olaitan is charged with four counts of wire fraud, two counts of interstate transportation of stolen property, two counts of aggravated identity theft, one count of identity theft, and one count of first-degree fraud. The indictment includes a notification of the United States’ intent to seek the forfeiture of any proceeds Olaitan received as a result of the fraud scheme, identity theft, and interstate transportation of stolen property.

Olaitan was arraigned today in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The indictment against him was also unsealed today.  He was released following his initial court appearance, pending further court proceedings.

The indictment was announced by U.S. Attorney Matthew M. Graves and Wayne A. Jacobs, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office Criminal Division.

An indictment is merely a formal charge that a defendant has committed a violation of criminal law and is not evidence of guilt. Every defendant is presumed innocent until, and unless, proven guilty.

This case is being investigated by the FBI’s Washington Field Office. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Diane Lucas of the Fraud Section of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia, with assistance from Paralegal Specialists Daniel Haines and Mariela Andrade.

 

 

Isaac DePaula, 41, a loan officer for a mortgage company today admitted his role in a long-running, large-scale mortgage fraud scheme,

According to the documents filed in this and other cases and statements made in court:

From September 2006 to September 2010, DePaula and his conspirators engaged in a long-running, large-scale mortgage fraud conspiracy through a mortgage company called Premier Mortgage Services (PMS). The conspirators targeted properties in low-income areas of New Jersey. After recruiting straw buyers, the defendants used a variety of fraudulent documents to make it appear as though the straw buyers possessed far more assets, and earned far more income, than they actually did. The defendants then submitted these fraudulent documents as part of mortgage loan applications to financial institutions. Relying on these fraudulent documents, financial institutions provided mortgage loans for the subject properties.

The defendants then split the proceeds from the mortgages among themselves and others by using fraudulent settlement statements (HUD-1s), which hid the true sources and destinations of the mortgage funds provided by financial institutions. The defendants made false representations and provided fraudulent documents when, in fact, the straw buyers had no means of paying the mortgages on the subject properties, many of which entered into foreclosure proceedings.

The defendants played different roles in the scheme, and others charged and convicted included a part owner of PMS, an attorney who aided the fraud by performing closings on many of the subject properties, an accountant who created false documents, the owner of a real estate development company, several loan officers, and a paralegal for another attorney who also closed fraudulent transactions.

DePaula was a loan officer at PMS and recruited straw buyers, provided false and fraudulent documents to the straw buyers, and incorporated false and fraudulent documents into loan applications to induce financial institutions to fund mortgage loans. The loan officers profited illegally by receiving a commission from PMS for each mortgage loan that they closed, and also profited illegally by diverting portions of the fraudulently obtained mortgage proceeds for themselves, often via shell corporations or nominee bank accounts.

DePaula was a long-time fugitive who was charged by criminal complaint in 2012 and by indictment in 2016. He returned to the United States in March 2020 to face the charges in the indictment.

Acting U.S. Attorney Rachael A. Honig made the announcement.

The offense to which DePaula pleaded guilty carries a maximum potential penalty of 30 years in prison and a maximum fine of $1 million. Sentencing is scheduled for April 19, 2022.

Acting U.S. Attorney Honig credited special agents of the FBI, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr. in Newark; special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Michael Montanez in Newark; and special agents of the Federal Housing Finance Agency – Office of the Inspector General, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Robert W. Manchak, with the investigation leading to today’s guilty plea.

Jasmine Morgan, 32, Queens, New York has been charged today with grand larceny, identity theft and other crimes. The defendant allegedly posed as the granddaughter of an elderly veteran to fraudulently transfer a property deed into her name and then collected more than $134,000 when she sold the home in March 2020.

According to the charges, around February 6, 2020, the defendant claimed to be the granddaughter of a deceased Queens, New York homeowner and offered to facilitate the sale of his home on 198th Street in St. Albans, Queens, New York. Morgan and an unapprehended other – who posed as the homeowner – agreed to a sale price of $300,000 with a buyer and subsequently entered into a contract. Morgan allegedly accepted a $5,000 down payment and provided identification and a death certificate for the dead grandfather and an uncle.

On March 6, 2020, the defendant again purported herself to be the heir to the deceased homeowner’s estate when she appeared at a law firm in Queens for the closing with an unapprehended other, who again posed as the homeowner. The deed transfer for the property was confirmed by the lawyer, who gave the defendant a check for just over $134,000.

According to the complaint, the true owner of the home is a 74-year-old veteran who discovered the ruse when he was sued by the person who “bought” the home from Morgan. The victim did not transfer his deed and does not have a granddaughter.

The defendant allegedly cashed the check she received from the lawyer at a Brooklyn check cashing establishment and received cash.

Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz made the announcement.

District Attorney Katz said, “This defendant was ultimately caught in a tangled web of her own making – a paper trail of bogus transactions that revealed a complicated con to steal a man’s home. By posing as a grieving granddaughter, the defendant allegedly duped multiple people into believing she was entitled to a $134,000 payday from the sale of a house to which she had no rightful claim. The victim is a 74-year-old veteran who was left with a mess to unravel.

Morgan was arraigned on Tuesday before Queens Criminal Court Judge Karen Gopee on a 15-count criminal complaint. The defendant is charged with grand larceny in the second degree, criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree, identity theft in the first degree, falsifying business records in the first degree, scheme to defraud in the first degree and offering a false instrument for filing in the second degree. Judge Gopee ordered the defendant to return to Court on January31, 2022. If convicted, Morgan faces up to 15 years in prison.

The investigation was conducted by Detective Marcelo Razzo of the NYPD Special Frauds Squad and Assistant District Attorney Christina Hanophy, Deputy Bureau Chief of the Housing and Worker Protection Bureau of the Queens District Attorney’s Office who is also prosecuting the case under the supervision of Assistant District Attorney William Jorgenson, Bureau Chief, and under the overall supervision of Executive Assistant District Attorney for Investigations Gerard A. Brave.

Jeffrey M. Young-Bey, 65, Washington, District of Columbia, and Martina Yolanda Jones, 44, Baltimore, Maryland, were indicted earlier this month for a scheme in which they allegedly used fraudulent property deeds to steal residential real estate property in the District of Columbia

As alleged in the indictment, beginning at least as early as November 2019, Young-Bey and Jones conspired to steal real estate and obtain a loan against the property or sell the property for profit. Specifically, the indictment states, Young-Bey identified a target property located in the District of Columbia. Young-Bey then prepared a fraudulent property deed, including forged signatures of the true owners.  Young-Bey filed the deed with the District of Columbia Recorder of Deeds, transferring the title from the true owners to a corporate entity controlled by Young-Bey or Jones.  The residential real estate property was then encumbered or sold through means of materially false and fraudulent pretenses, representations, and promises.

As a result of the scheme, the indictment alleges, Jones and Young-Bey obtained $323,224 from a fraudulent loan taken out on one property.

In addition, according to the indictment, Young-Bey received $268,036 from the sale of a second property in the District of Columbia that he allegedly stole and sold through the same scheme.  With these fraudulent proceeds, the indictment alleges, Young-Bey purchased a 2020 BMW 750XI worth over $106,000 and a 2016 BMW 328XI worth over $21,000.

All told, the indictment alleges, the scheme generated more than $500,000 in illegal proceeds.

In connection with Young-Bey’s activity, the Government has seized $269,239, as well as the 2020 BMW 750XI.

The announcement was made by U.S. Attorney Matthew M. Graves and Wayne A. Jacobs, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI Washington Field Office’s Criminal Division.

Young-Bey was arrested on November 22, 2021, and Jones was arrested on November 27, 2021. Both have made their initial appearances in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Young-Bey was arrested on Nov. 22, 2021, and Jones was arrested on Nov. 27, 2021. Both have made their initial appearances in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

An indictment is merely a formal charge that a defendant has committed a violation of criminal law and is not evidence of guilt. Every defendant is presumed innocent until, and unless, proven guilty.

This case is being investigated by the FBI’s Washington Field Office.  It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Joshua S. Rothstein and Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Viviana Vasiu, both from the Fraud Section of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia.

Ronald J. McCord, 71, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was sentenced this morning to serve 104 months in prison for defrauding locally-based banks, Fannie Mae, homeowners, and others through a broad range of fraudulent conduct.

On June 3, 2020, a grand jury returned a 24-count Indictment against McCord.  The charges included bank fraud, money laundering, and making a false statement to a financial institution.  McCord was the Chairman and founder of First Mortgage Company, LLC (“FMC”), an Oklahoma City, Oklahoma based mortgage lending and loan servicing company.  In May 2021, McCord pleaded guilty to five counts of that Indictment.  McCord admitted to defrauding Spirit Bank (“Spirit”) and Citizens State Bank (“Citizens”)—two state-chartered financial institutions—as well as their respective residential mortgage subsidiaries, American Southwest Mortgage Corporation (“Mortgage Corp.”) and American Southwest Mortgage Funding Corporation (“Funding Corp.”).  An independent audit discovered that McCord had sold more than $14,100,000.00 in Spirit/Mortgage Corp. and Citizens/Funding Corp. loans “out of trust” by failing to repay Spirit/Mortgage Corp. when certain Spirit/Mortgage Corp.-initiated loans were refinanced or otherwise paid off.  At the time of this discovery, FMC carried outstanding balances of about $200,000,000.00 and $140,000,000.00 on the Spirit/Mortgage Corp. and Citizens/Funding Corp. lines of credit, respectively.

Upon learning of McCord’s conduct, Spirit/Mortgage Corp. and Citizens/Funding Corp. terminated future warehouse lending to FMC, and instituted new notification requirements that required McCord to assign FMC-funded mortgages to Spirit/Mortgage Corp. and Citizens/Funding Corp., to ensure the title companies handling those mortgages sent payoffs directly to the banks.  McCord admitted at his change of plea hearing that he filed the assignments as required, but then caused the mortgages to be released on two properties—in Leland and Denver, North Carolina—after collecting the mortgage payoffs.

Spirit/Mortgage Corp. and Citizens/Funding Corp.’s refusal to fund new FMC mortgages prompted McCord to seek out a new warehouse lender.  In early 2017, McCord began negotiating with CapLOC, LLC, a North Carolina-based mortgage lending business, and offered to sell FMC’s mortgage lending business in exchange for quick funding from CapLOC.  McCord admitted that he made a materially false statement and representation to CapLOC in the course of those negotiations, in order to influence CapLOC’s actions.

Finally, in 2017, FMC serviced approximately 12,000 loans worth a total of approximately $1,800,000,000.00 for the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”).  McCord admitted at his plea hearing that he defrauded Fannie Mae by diverting escrow monies intended to pay homeowners’ taxes and insurance premiums to cover FMC’s operating expenses.  McCord also admitted that he then laundered the proceeds by causing a wire transfer from FMC’s operating account to a custom home builder, as payment towards construction of McCord’s vacation home in Colorado.

The announcement was made by Acting U.S. Attorney Robert J. Troester.

This was a carefully calculated scheme by which the defendant defrauded local banks out of tens of millions of dollars, made false statements to a financial institution, diverted escrow monies intended to pay homeowners’ taxes and insurance premiums to cover his company’s operating expenses, and then laundered the proceeds to fund his lavish lifestyle,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Troester.  “This sentence should serve as notice that those who defraud financial institutions for personal gain will be held accountable.”

McCord was also ordered to pay $51,861,806.40 in restitution to the victims of his fraudulent schemes.

At today’s sentencing hearing, the Honorable Robin J. Cauthron found that McCord caused a total loss of more than $95,000,000.00 to local banks, other financial institutions, and borrower homeowners.  Judge Cauthron heard statements from representatives of three of those victims, as well as argument from both parties, before rendering the 104-month sentence.  The Court ordered McCord to self-surrender to the Federal Bureau of Prisons on January 6, 2022 to commence his term of imprisonment.  The Court also ordered McCord to serve three years of supervised release following his term of incarceration.

This case was the result of investigations by the Federal Housing Finance Agency – Office of the Inspector General, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation – Office of Inspector General, and the FBI Oklahoma City Field Office.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Julia E. Barry prosecuted the case.

Reference is made to court filings for further information.

Ernesto Diaz, 66, former El Monte, California resident, a former realtor and longtime fugitive was sentenced today to 48 months in federal prison for scheming to defraud distressed homeowners out of nearly $4 million by falsely promising them help with their mortgages, but instead pocketing their money, causing many victims to lose their homes.

According to evidence presented at his trial, from March 2010 to March 2011, Diaz and co-defendant Maria Marcella Gonzalez, 51, Whittier, California ran a fraudulent mortgage-elimination program that operated in Montebello, California under the names “Crown Point Education Inc.” and “Crown Point Inc.” Diaz and Gonzalez advertised to distressed homeowners that the Crown Point program could eliminate whatever balance existed on their mortgages.

Several homeowners testified at trial that they had fallen behind on their mortgage payments during the financial crisis of 2007-08 because of workplace injuries, medical bills and other personal circumstances. In exchange, the homeowners paid Crown Point thousands of dollars for its services, typically with a partial payment demanded at the program’s inception, followed by monthly fees.

Diaz and Gonzalez offered seminars describing the Crown Point program to prospective customers but refused to specify – citing the need to protect the company’s proprietary information – how they purportedly eliminated existing mortgages.

At the seminars, Diaz and Gonzalez guaranteed that the Crown Point program would be successful and had cleared the mortgage problems of past customers. Diaz and Gonzalez also met personally with customers and prospective customers to make similar promises of success, assuage concerns of customers who had seen no signs of success, and demand additional payments. Diaz and Gonzalez often counseled customers to cease mortgage payments to their lenders altogether and to pay Crown Point instead.

After clients signed up for the program and paid a fee – usually $15,000 per property – Diaz and Gonzalez directed others to mail packets of information to the clients’ lenders that falsely asserted that the client’s mortgages were invalid and that mortgages would be extinguished if the lenders did not respond. Many of the mailed documents were notarized to create the appearance of legitimacy, at times using the notary stamp of Diaz’s own sister without her knowledge or consent.

In fact, Crown Point had no success in eliminating customer mortgage debt and many customers – including Diaz’s brother – lost their homes.

One integral part of the scheme involved the filing of unauthorized bankruptcy petitions to delay the foreclosure process, leaving victims with the impression that the Crown Point program was working and inducing them to continue making payments, but damaging clients’ credit ratings in the process.

Many, though not all, of [Diaz’s] victims could have qualified for loan modifications or legitimate foreclosure forbearance programs to save their homes but, in reliance on [Diaz’s] lies, were never able to avail themselves of these options,” prosecutors wrote in a sentencing memorandum.

Diaz, who fled to Mexico after entering into a plea agreement in this case in 2012, pleaded guilty on September 9, 2012 to a separate count of failure to appear in court while released on bond. He was a fugitive for seven years until the FBI arrested him in October 2019. A federal grand jury in February 2020 returned a superseding indictment against him, which led to this year’s trial.

Gonzalez pleaded guilty in July 2015 to two-count superseding information charging her with making a false statement in a bankruptcy declaration. Judge Wilson sentenced her to 70 months in federal prison.

At the conclusion of a three-day trial, a federal jury on September 13, 2021 found Diaz guilty of one count of conspiracy, two counts of mail fraud affecting a financial institution, and one count of mail fraud. The jury acquitted him on one mail fraud count.

Diaz was also ordered to pay $3,061,159 in restitution to his victims.

The FBI investigated this matter.

Assistant United States Attorneys Alexander B. Schwab of the Major Frauds Section and Julia Hu of the General Crimes Section prosecuted this case.

 

 

Shonda Coleman, 49, Toms River, New Jersey, and Robert Goodrich, 62, Sayreville, New Jersey were sentenced today for their roles in a mortgage-fraud scheme.

According to documents filed in the case and statements made in court:

From 2009 to 2011 Coleman worked at Westinghouse Redevelopment Act Inc., a New Jersey business entity. In November 2009, Coleman submitted a fraudulent mortgage loan application to the lender to finance her own purchase of a home from Westinghouse. That application falsely represented, among other things, that Coleman owned $165,000 in cash, a representation intended to make Coleman appear more creditworthy than she actually was. In March 2011, Coleman again participated in the mortgage fraud scheme by helping to prepare and submit a mortgage application for a prospective buyer of a Westinghouse real estate property that she knew contained false information regarding the buyer’s finances.

Goodrich appeared at the closings for both the November 2009 and March 2011 transactions and signed settlement statements that he knew contained false information regarding the buyers’ creditworthiness.

Coleman previously pleaded guilty before Judge Wigenton to two counts of an indictment charging her and, with bank fraud. Goodrich had previously pleaded guilty before Judge Wigenton to the same two counts of the indictment to which Coleman pleaded guilty and was sentenced on April 7, 2021, sentenced to 27 months in prison. Judge Wigenton imposed Coleman’s sentence today by videoconference.

Acting U.S. Attorney Rachael A. Honig made the announcement.

Acting U.S. Attorney Honig credited special agents of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Office of Inspector General, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Robert Manchak, and the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Office of Inspector General, Mid-Atlantic Region, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Shawn Rice, with the investigation leading to the sentencing.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrew M. Trombly of the Cybercrime Unit and Special Assistant U.S. Attorneys Kevin V. Di Gregory and Charlie L. Divine of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Office of Inspector General.